$4 Million Compensation follows $5.7 millions

January 29, 2008

Everyone hears about the “McDonald” case ad nauseum but this sort of cases where the doctor is simply negligent again and again and people die again and again is not heard of much.

$4 Million Awarded in Wrongful Death Suit after 45 Minutes Deliberation

A Wetzel County jury deliberated for about 45 minutes before deciding a New Martinsville doctor should pay $4 million to the surviving children of a woman who died from what one witness called an “intra-abdominal catastrophe.”

The wrongful death verdict is the second multi-million dollar decision against Dr. Anandhi Murthy in the past 10 months.

Just last spring, the law firm Bordas & Bordas of Wheeling obtained a $5.7 million award against Murthy on behalf of another plaintiff.

In the most recent case, Elizabeth Karpacs, 76, came to Wetzel County Hospital in June 2001 with serious abdominal symptoms and complaints, according to testimony in the case. Testimony during the four-day civil trial showed that surgery would have been needed to correct a life-threatening ischemic bowel condition, Karpacs’ attorneys said. Murthy instead treated Karpacs with fluids and antibiotics, the patient went home for the evening and Murthy did not see her again. She died the next morning.

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Radiation Leads to Disability

January 26, 2008

Alaska Supreme Court Decision Could Impact Wireless Safety Issues

The Alaska Supreme Court upheld a decision by the Alaska Workers’ Compensation Board awarding an AT&T equipment installer 100% disability benefits due to his exposure to radio frequency (RF) radiation at levels slightly above the FCC’s safety limit.

AT&T worker John Orchitt complained of headaches, eye pain and “mental slowing” following an incident where he was exposed to a 6 GHz signal operating at about 90 W. When Orchitt entered the job site, the amplifier was supposed to have been turned off, but he soon discovered that the wrong amplifier had been disabled. According to EMR Policy Institute, a consumer advocacy group specializing in wireless health issues, Orchitt’s MRI after the incident showed, “tiny areas of hypersensitivity in the frontal lobes.”

Orchitt’s RF exposure level was well below the FCC’s recognized level of “thermal” harm. Though the FCC claims there are no scientifically established harmful effects to a person’s health when exposed to RF levels below the thermal threshold, the Alaska Worker Compensation Board’s decision agrees with medical experts’ findings of adverse health effects occurring above the FCC safety limit but below the thermal threshold.

AT&T appealed the workers compensation board’s decision initially to Alaska’s superior court and then to Alaska’s Supreme Court, which upheld the board’s original decision, stating, “The board has the sole power to determine witness credibility and assign weight to medical testimony. When medical experts disagree about the cause of an employee’s injury, we have held that as a general rule, ‘it is undeniably the province of the Board and not this court to decide who to believe and who to distrust.'”

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January 21, 2008

Martin Luther King Day
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbUtL_0vAJk]
This is a video of his full “I Have Dream Speech.” We mostly have heard excerpts, but it is worth the time to hear the complete version.

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New Radeon Law

January 17, 2008

New Radeon Law Requires Info Before Sale

Starting Jan. 1, when a buyer and seller sign a contract on residential real estate property in Illinois, the new Illinois Radon Awareness Act now applies to the sales transaction.According to the new law, the seller must supply the buyer with two documents before the buyer will become bound on a contract to purchase the property. One is a pamphlet from the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, “Radon Testing Guidelines for Real Estate Transactions.” The other is a form to sign called “Disclosure of Information on Radon Hazards.”Radon is an odorless, tasteless gas. It is formed from the radioactive decay of uranium, which is found in small amounts in most rocks and soil. Exposure to high levels of radon results in an increased risk of lung cancer, according to the IEMA.“The new radon law applies to residential properties from single-family homes to four-unit buildings,” said Kay Wirth, president of the Illinois Association of Realtors.The new law does not require sellers to test for radon in the home or to reduce the concentration if elevated levels are found. The seller and buyer may negotiate whether further testing or remediation are necessary. In most cases, a seller will simply provide the two documents to the buyer before the contract takes effect.If you have a contract pending that was signed before Jan. 1, the law does not apply.

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Trinity Taking Swing at MRSA

January 12, 2008

Quad-Cities Online

rinity Regional Health System is implementing a plan to test more patients for a drug-resistant staph bacteria with hopes of eradicating it from its hospitals.

The germ is called MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A new Illinois law requires hospitals to test intensive-care unit patients for the bacteria.

Carol Dwyer, who has a master’s degree in nursing and is Trinity’s vice president of hospital operations and chief nurse executive, said the health system this week expanded its testing to include the Terrace Park campus in Bettendorf, although Iowa does not have a law requiring it.

“Trinity came forward as a health care organization informing and educating the community about what MRSA is, how you get it, how to prevent it, how it’s treated and where it really originates,” Ms. Dwyer said.

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Is Water Considered Soft Drink?

January 6, 2008

Chicago sued over bottled water tax

The Chicago City Council on Jan. 1 imposed a first-in-the-nation 5-cent tax on bottled water sold in the city in the hopes of decreasing plastic waste and generating $10.5 million in revenue, the Chicago Sun-Times reported Saturday.

The lawsuit says the tax is illegal because it evades a state law prohibiting taxation on food consumed away from the establishment of purchase.

The suit states bottled water is not classified as a soft drink and should be therefore considered in the same group as milk, sports beverages and teas, a group not subject to tax.

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