University of Chicago Hospital Settles for $7M

June 30, 2010

When University of Chicago Hospital crowded the babies in spaces meant for one, the Illinois Attorney General sued them and the lawsuit has now been settled for $7,000,000.00. That is welcome money for the State and the community hospitals and clinics who will see more than $5,000,000.00 of that money.

The University of Chicago Medical Center will pay $7 million to settle a lawsuit for crowding babies in spaces meant for one in its preemie unit, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan sued the medical center in 2006 for violating state licensing regulations by exceeding the capacity of its neonatal ICU. The hospital placed two or more infants in bed spaces designed for one for more than 5,300 patient days between 1997 and 2005, Madigan’s office alleged.

“Double-bunking,” or placing babies in side-by-side cribs in a space designed for one crib–violates industry and state guidelines and may increase the risk of infection, according to MedLaw.com.

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Illinois Sues Countrywide Over Subrprime Loans

June 30, 2010

At issue is the subprime loans and the fact that it appears that Countrywide may have charged a higher interest for loans to minorities than the white folks…

The state of Illinois sued former mortgage giant Countrywide Financial Corp. on Tuesday for allegedly using discriminatory lending practices for minority borrowers.

The lawsuit, filed in Cook County Circuit Court by Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan, said an investigation revealed that African-American and Latino borrowers were much more likely to be given risky subprime loans by the lender than similarly situated whites from 2005 to 2007.

The lawsuit also alleged that a statistical analysis revealed that the company charged Latino and African-American borrowers more interest and fees on certain mortgages than whites.

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Hospital Lien Is Subject To Common Fund Doctrine

June 30, 2010

Wendling v. Woolard; Howell v. Dunaway, Nos. 110199 & 110200 Cons. , 5th District of Illinois, is a case that was decided in March 2010. At issue in this case was whether a hospital’s statutory lien for services rendered to an injured plaintiff, which was filed pursuant to the Health Care Services Lien Act, should be subject to a reduction under the common-fund doctrine for attorney fees incurred by the injured plaintiff.

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What Tort Reform Really Means

June 30, 2010

“Tort-reform” is a PR phrase describing policy that allows corporations and other special interests to escape accountability. Typical tort reforms include legal loopholes, immunities, favors for multinational corporations and powerful special interests, and limits on the constitutional rights of ordinary people to trial by jury. – ROBERT M. RAITT

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New Website Is Now Active

June 28, 2010

Well, folks, we have a new website and it is now active.

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Just In Case You Needed Another Reason in Favor of Universal Health Care System

June 15, 2010

New Survey Finds Free Clinics Heavily Burdened

“Our nation’s 46 million uninsured often delay or forgo needed healthcare because the cost is prohibitive,” said study author Julie S. Darnell, PhD, MHSA, then of the University of Chicago and now with the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The mean cost for a doctor visit for uninsured patients is around $50, Darnell wrote.

Traditional sources of care, including public clinics and federal health centers, both charge fees and bill patients. “Aside from cost considerations, care is frequently difficult to find, especially for those with the least resources,” Darnell added. For many poor, uninsured, and underserved patients, the only sources of care are emergency rooms or free clinics.

At the time of the survey, 1,007 free clinics were known to be operating throughout 49 states and the District of Columbia (Alaska was the lone exception).

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