Personal Injury Awards – $1.2M Settlement for Worker Who Slipped Out of Unsafe Harness

September 19, 2014

The plaintiff, Christopher Connors, had a safety belt around his waist that was supplied by Big Joe Manufacturing Company, which designed and manufactured the lift. But the belt was loose and slipped off over his head when he fell from the platform.

Connors, who was 29 at the time, suffered severe spine and back injuries. The lawsuit alleged Big Joe, the defendant, was negligent in that it failed to mandate the use of a full body harness as a fall protection system and provided Best Buy with unsafe instructions and warnings.

via $1.2M Settlement for Best Buy Worker Who Slipped Out of Unsafe Harness.

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Wrongful Death – Tower Climbing Death and Question of Control

June 6, 2012

Understanding the contracting chain on cell tower jobs can be complicated, but crucial when workers die.

William “Bubba” Cotton, 43, was the first of 11 cellsiteworkers who died on AT&T projects from 2006 through 2008, years when the carrier merged its network with Cingular and ramped up its 3G network for the iPhone.

As ProPublica and PBS “Frontline” reported last month, tower climbing ranks among the most dangerous jobs in America, having a death rate roughly 10 times that of construction. The project Cotton was on involved several layers of subcontractors, which is common in the tower industry. The accident was more unusual. Most of the 50 tower climbers killed on cell site jobs since 2003 have died in falls, but Cotton was crushed to death by an antenna.

A wrongful death lawsuit subsequently filed by Cotton’s survivors, as well as a personal injury suit filed by his cousin and co-worker, Charles “Randy” Wheeler, explored two questions at the heart of every tower fatality: Who controlled the tower site? And who was responsible for the safety of the subcontractors working on it?

Read More:

via Anatomy Of A Cell Tower Death · OPB News.

tower death

The AT&T cell tower job in which William Cotton died involved several layers of subcontractors. This chart shows which companies in the contracting chain were investigated by OSHA and the results of litigation by Cotton’s family and his co-worker, Charles Wheeler.

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Work Injury – Product Liability – Doctors Remove 3.5-inch Nail from Worker’s Brain

March 20, 2012

workplace injuryWhat came to my mind was a question about safety of the nail gun used. As lawnmower have what is commonly referred to as a “dead-man’s switch” which cuts of the engine to the mower if the operator lets go of the handle, I am surprised that a nail gun could still fire without anyone holding it. Here, the accident occurred when the worker let go of the nail gun and it fell on his head! I like to hear about what causes of action, aside from the obvious worker’s compensation claim resulting from the workplace injuries, an attorney looking at the facts and the details could come up with. Off the top of my head, I see a potential product liability case here.

Autullo was standing on a ladder, reaching over his head to drive nails into the top of a wall, when he lost his grip on his nail gun. The recoil swung the gun back and pressed it against his skull. From the outside, it appeared to be a minor scrape, but just below the skin was the head of a nail.

via Doctors remove 3.5-inch nail from man’s brain – chicagotribune.com.

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